Poop on Meat Still Allowed; Just Has to Be Labelled

Poop on Meat Still Allowed; Just Has to Be Labelled

At least 130 people have been wracked with severe abdominal cramps and bloody diarrhea in the latest E. coli infection outbreak in Alberta. Although officials haven’t determined the cause of the outbreak, all E. coli outbreaks can be traced back to poop: farmed animal poop in particular. 

E. coli bacteria primarily live in the intestines of cattle (although they have also been found in the intestines of chickens, sheep, and pigs). The bacteria spread to the outside, and subsequently onto the meat people eat, during the slaughter process. Poop on meat is such a problem that health officials advise meat be thoroughly cooked before consumption.

The problem is compounded in meats like hamburger, where outside poopy bits can end up on the inside during the grinding process. Mechanical tenderization whereby metal needles are pushed into meat such as steaks also push poop from the outside to the inside. Just last week, Canadian health officials announced mandatory labelling on all mechanically tenderized meat so consumers can know that poop may not only be on the outside of the meat, but on the inside as well.

Luckily, you can avoid poopy meat and bloody diarrhea by moving toward a plant-based diet. To learn more, visit ChooseVeg.ca.