WHAT?!? These Scientists Discovered That Fish Sing - Mercy For Animals

WHAT?!? These Scientists Discovered That Fish Sing

A recent New Scientist article discusses findings by marine researchers from Curtin University in Perth, Australia. The experts recorded fish vocalizing in the coastal waters off Port Headland in Western Australia over an 18-month period.

The vocalizations, which are a lot like grunting and buzzer noises, play a vital role in different fish behaviors, including reproduction, feeding, and territorial conflict. Essentially, this is how fish communicate with one another. Nocturnal predatory fish use calls as a way to keep the group together during hunting while diurnal fish use sounds to defend their territory. Scientists compared their noises to those of birds.

Robert McCauley from the university states:
I’ve been listening to fish squawks, burble and pops for nearly 30 years now, and they still amaze me with their variety. We are only just beginning to appreciate the complexity involved and still have only a crude idea of what is going on in the undersea acoustic environment.
While we still have a lot to learn about marine life, one thing is certain: Fish and other aquatic animals are sentient beings capable of feeling pain. Additionally, they’re able to experience pleasure in ways similar to dogs, cats, and other animals.

If the fact that fish are sentient isn’t reason enough not to eat them, depopulation of species by the fishing industry must be. A report from the World Wildlife Fund and the Zoological Society of London reveals that the number of fish and other aquatic animals dropped 49 percent between 1970 and 2012 primarily due to overfishing.

Whether it be to prevent animal suffering or to protect our oceans from overfishing, you can remove your support from the cruel and destructive fishing industry by leaving fish off your plate.

Check out amazing vegan versions of fish and other seafood, such as Gardein’s fishless filets and crabless cakes, available nationwide. Click here for compassionate sea-inspired recipes.

For more information on transitioning to a kind vegan diet, visit ChooseVeg.com.